Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI)

The use of manganese ions (Mn(2+)) as an MRI contrast agent was introduced over 20 years ago in studies of Mn(2+) toxicity in anesthetized rats (1). Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) evolved in the late nineties when Koretsky and associates pioneered the use of MEMRI for brain activity measurements (2) as well as neuronal tract tracing (3). Currently, MEMRI has three primary applications in biological

Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) is a method used primarily in basic science experiments to advance the understanding of information processing in central nervous system pathways. With this mechanistic approach, manganese (Mn(2+)) acts as a

Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Anthony T. Cacace, Tom Brozoski, Bruce Berkowitz, Carol Bauer, Boris Odintsov, Magnus Bergkvist, James Castracane, Jinsheng Zhang, Avril Genene Holt, Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI): A powerful new imaging method to study tinnitus, Hearing Research, 10.1016/j.heares.2014.02.003, 311, (49-62), (2014).

Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

02/10/2013 An ex vivo functional imaging technique, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), was used to identify and distinguish brain regions that are differentially activated by an acute swim stress (15 min) in rats with a history of social stress compared to controls.

Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Manganese‐enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is being increasingly used for MRI in animals due to the unique T 1 contrast that is sensitive to a number of biological processes. Three specific uses of MEMRI have been demonstrated: to visualize activity in the brain and the heart; to trace neuronal specific connections in the brain; and to enhance the brain cytoarchitecture after a systemic dose. Based on an ever‐growing number of applications, MEMRI is proving useful as a new molecular imaging

(PDF) Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) relies on the strong paramagnetism of Mn2+. Mn2+ is a calcium ion analog and can enter excitable

Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

In particular, we demonstrate the utility of this Mn-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) method for analyzing early postnatal patterning of the mouse cerebellum. Through comparisons with matched histological sections, we further show that MEMRI enhancement correlates qualitatively with granule cell density in the developing cerebellum, suggesting that the cerebellar enhancement is due to uptake of Mn in the

Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) is a widely used technique in rodent neuroimaging studies. Traditionally, Mn2+is delivered to animals via a systemic injection; however, this

(PDF) Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance

Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 54:196 –200 (2005) Manganese Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Normal and Ischemic Canine Heart Tom C.-C. Hu,1,3 Timothy F. Christian,2,4 Anthony H. Aletras,2 Joni L. Taylor,2 Alan P. Koretsky,1 and Andrew E. Arai2* The ability of MnCl2 to enhance canine myocardium and to paper describing MRI (3). Recently it has been demon- delineate ischemic

Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI): methodological and practical considerations. Afonso C. Silva. Corresponding Author . E-mail address: [email protected] Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging, National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD, USA. Cerebral Microcirculation Unit, Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging

(PDF) Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance

Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) relies on the strong paramagnetism of Mn2+. Mn2+ is a calcium ion analog and can enter excitable

Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Abstract Manganese‐enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is being increasingly used for MRI in animals due to the unique T1 contrast that is sensitive to a number of biological processes. Three specific uses of MEM...

[PDF] Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance

This special issue of NMR in Biomedicine on manganese‐enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is aimed at providing the readers of this journal with an extensive review of some of the most prominent applications of MEMRI in biological systems. Written by several of the leaders in the field, the reviews and original research articles featured in this special issue are likely to offer an exciting and inspiring

Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

01/05/2014 Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) is a relatively new imaging method that is not dependent upon blood flow. This methodology has unique capabilities for identifying cerebral architecture, mapping neuronal pathways, and objectively evaluating the physiologic extent and spatial locations of cerebral function ( Pautler, 2004,Pautler, 2006,Boretius and Frahm,

Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) is a widely used technique in rodent neuroimaging studies. Traditionally, Mn2+is delivered to animals via a systemic injection; however, this

Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Mangafodipir is a novel manganese-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast medium with unique biophysical properties that are ideal for application to cardiac imaging. Recent studies in man have demonstrated the utility of manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) in assessing infarct size more accurately than with standard cardiac MRI protocols using gadolinium enhancement and have shown

Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). Coronavirus: Find the latest articles and preprints Sign in or create an account. https://orcid

Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) Koretsky, Alan P.; Silva, Afonso C. 2004-11-01 00:00:00 Manganese ion (Mn2+) is an essential metal that participates as a cofactor in a number of critical biological functions, such as electron transport, detoxification of free radicals and synthesis of neurotransmitters.

Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) is a widely used technique in rodent neuroimaging studies. Traditionally, Mn2+is delivered to animals via a systemic injection; however, this

Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Abstract Manganese‐enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is being increasingly used for MRI in animals due to the unique T1 contrast that is sensitive to a number of biological processes. Three specific uses of MEM...

[PDF] Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance

This special issue of NMR in Biomedicine on manganese‐enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is aimed at providing the readers of this journal with an extensive review of some of the most prominent applications of MEMRI in biological systems. Written by several of the leaders in the field, the reviews and original research articles featured in this special issue are likely to offer an exciting and inspiring

(PDF) Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance

Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI): methodological and practical considerations Afonso Silva INTRODUCTIONManganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is being increasingly used for MRI in animals due to the unique T 1 contrast that is sensitive to a

Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Mangafodipir is a novel manganese-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast medium with unique biophysical properties that are ideal for application to cardiac imaging. Recent studies in man have demonstrated the utility of manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) in assessing infarct size more accurately than with standard cardiac MRI protocols using gadolinium enhancement and have shown

Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI): methodological and practical considerations. Silva AC, Lee JH, Aoki I, Koretsky AP. NMR Biomed, 17(8):532-543, 01 Dec 2004 Cited by: 277 articles PMID: 15617052. Review

Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). Coronavirus: Find the latest articles and preprints Sign in or create an account. https://orcid

Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

There is growing interest in the use of manganese‐enhanced MRI (MEMRI) to detect neuronal activity and architecture in animal models. The MEMRI neuronal activity studies have been generally performed either by stereotactic brain injection or by systemic administration of Mn2+ in conjunction with the disruption of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). These approaches, however, have limited the

Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) Manganese‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) Koretsky, Alan P.; Silva, Afonso C. 2004-11-01 00:00:00 Manganese ion (Mn2+) is an essential metal that participates as a cofactor in a number of critical biological functions, such as electron transport, detoxification of free radicals and synthesis of neurotransmitters.

Quantitative activation-induced manganese-enhanced

10/08/2015 Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) is being increasingly used for investigating neuronal pathways, brain architecture and neuronal activities in